Tag Archives: Equipment

SA Health Budget Waste – Jack Snelling take note!

There has been a change in SA Health his year as outgoing Health Minister John Hill retires and Jack Snelling steps into place. I don’t envy whoever has this portfolio – the cost of health continues to rise, as does demand – and yet available health budgets are shrinking.

This week the ABC reported $1 billion health cuts over the next 4 years in SA health. The Minister was reported as saying “I think we can reduce the number of clinical staff and still maintain a reasonable level of services.” Personally I disagree – hospitals are already at capacity and despite ‘efficiency saving reports’ from the likes of KPMG, ministers need to realise that you cannot run health like a widget-factory; there needs to be surge capacity and slack in the system. However, I am all for saving money when appropriate. Which is why recent spending on unnecessary equipment by Country Health SA puzzles me.

In late 2012 a new anaesthetic monitor was delivered to us on Kangaroo Island. We were told it was part of an across Country Health SA strategy “to meet requirements” in Operating Theatres. Sure enough, the new monitor is a ‘you beaut’ device, with touchscreen technology and allowing us to do fancy things like spirometry and bispectral index sensing – which we never had before.

The problem is, the old monitor worked perfectly well and didn’t need replacing. I’ve checked and double-checked the ANZCA guidelines – and can’t find a requirement to have these extra functions which we’ve been told are ‘mandatory’. I’m not even convinced of the need for BIS, other than in paralysed patients being transported where risk of sedation failure may be present (read more on BIS here).

The disappointing thing is that we really need an EXTRA monitor in our location.

Currently post-op patients are monitored in ‘Recovery’ which is also our small ‘Emergency Room’. We use the MRX defib as a post-op patient monitor. Which is fine, so long as there is no emergency patient who also needs monitoring. As well as the need for two monitors, there have also been occasions when the anaesthetic monitor has malfunctioned – so having a backup immediately available makes good sense (particularly when you are on an Island!)

Using MRX defib as sole monitor in ED/Recovery - no backup!

Using MRX defib as sole monitor in ED/Recovery – no backup!

So my efforts in the past have been directed to getting an additional monitor for our ED/Recovery…as well as to purchase equipment to meet ANZCA standards (equipment to manage a difficult airway being one particular bugbear). We’ve had some success – we’ve sourced and fitted out a difficult airway trolley and some signage. Sadly there has been no committment by CHSA to supply a fibreoptic device or videolaryngoscope (I ended up purchasing my own) to manage a difficult airway…and have been told there are ‘no funds’ to purchase an additional monitor.

The Health Minister Mr Jack Snelling wants to save money. I get that. But this new monitor allegedly cost $17K. There are fifteen sites across CountryHealth SA which provide anaesthesia – so that’s $255K spent on monitors which may not be needed.

There you go Mr Snelling – a $255K saving for you.

I’ve emailed the CHSA lead for anaesthesia, Dr Sara Norton to ask about this. She tells me she was unaware of the decision to purchase these new monitors and did not consider either BIS or spirometry as mandatory requirements for monitoring. Which makes the purchase of these $17K per piece monitors even more puzzling. To date, Sara has not been able to get an explanation from Peter Chapman (Acting CEO of CHSA) re: this decision.

Seriously – that money could have been better spent in rural hospitals on essential additional equipment. We are repeatedly told there is ‘no money’ and purchase of much equipment falls upon efforts by local charities like CWA and Rotary. I think rural Australians deserve the same access to essential equipment as their metro cousins…and wish that decisions on equipment purchase were made in consultation with local clinicians.

Perhaps Jack Snelling should be asking Dr Peter Chapman – who is making these decisions and where is the governance?

Difficult Airway Equipment and Rural GP Anaesthetists in Australia

Well, it’s been almost just over 9 months since I put out a survey to rural GP-Anaesthetists (GPAs) in Australia….was surely tempted to put the results up on this blog back in April/May once the data had been crunched, but I stood on academic convention and deferred discussion until the paper came out – which was this week….click here to download a printable PDF version.

Another argument for the power of #FOAMed over traditional textbook-journal-conference methods of disseminating information, perhaps?

 

 

So, what was this all about? Well, it was only last year that I spent 12 months upskilling in anaesthetics before returning home to Kangaroo Island, SA. Whilst the training I received was invaluable, and to the standard required of the ‘Joint Consultative Committee in Anaesthesia” (JCCA), I think there is a gap between the reality of rural practice and that in the city. Don’t get me wrong. Rural GPAs do a great job. They provide elective anaesthesia to appropriately screened and case-selected patients…as well as manage emergency airways in challenging circumstances.

But I found two things that troubled me in my year of upskilling and attendance at rural anaesthetic conferences in NSW and SA

(i) many specialist anaesthetists did not ‘get’ the realities of rural anaesthesia. Some were dead against the notion of GPAs full stop (yeah right fellas – I’ll stop giving anaesthetics once you guys commit to providing specialist services in the bush).

Others accepted the idea of appropriately-trained GPAs delivering services – but expected us to have access to all the gizmos and resources of a tertiary centre, not understanding the limitations of rural practice and that the work of a rural GPA encompasses not just elective anaesthesia, but also emergency airway management in the absence of immediate backup.

(ii) There is a plethora of new airway devices and algorithms to manage difficult airways – but this equipment may not be available in cash-strapped rural hospitals. This is despite guidelines from ANZCA on difficult airway equipment availability.

So I decided in Jan 2012 to conduct a survey of rural GPAs in my home State of South Australia. Once I’d worked out my questionnaire, it seemed not too difficult to extend the questionnaire to rural GPAs in other States. Sadly no one seems to have a clear idea of how many GPAs there are ‘out there’ – there is no central database, and conflicting data from RACGP and ACRRM on humber of GPs registered under the procedural grant program for anaesthesia (Medicare of course declined to release data). A National Minimum Dataset from 2010 suggested 448 rural GPAs in Oz and so I targetted these through invitations to complete survey via ACRRM/RACGP/RDAA and State-based rural doctor workforce agencies.

Apparently a 65% response rate is good for an internet-based survey; respondents were broadly representative in terms of RA 2-5 distribution, demographics and experience in anaesthesia. Open and closed-question responses were interesting – only 58% of rural GPAs had access to dedicated difficult airway equipment. Many were frustrated with their access to such equipment. Importantly, many did not have access to the appropriate equipment to manage each of the stages of recognised Difficult Airway Algorithms.

This is surprising – there are published Standards for difficult airway equipment in locations where elective anaesthesia is performed, as well as guidelines on difficult airway algorithms. Yet many respondents indicated non-compliance. Moreover, there are AFFORDABLE and ROBUST solutions out there – I’ll post some suggestions on an affordable rural GP-Anaesthetist toolkit in a few weeks or so. Suffice it to say, affordable & robust equipment is out there for less than $5K and there is really no excuse no to have this kit in your OT or ED.

My survey also looked at the involvement of rural doctors in prehospital emergencies – I reckon this is bread n butter for rural docs, but it was interesting that although over 50% of rural GPAs reported their involvement in such work, the majority had had no training in this arena, did not have concordance of protocols with RFDS/retrieval services and furthermore such responses were often ad hoc, not a formal arrangement. Overseas modes such as the UK’s BASICS suggest better models that perhaps Australia (with it’s tyranny of distance) could and should emulate….

By all means have a look at the paper – it’s in Rural & Remote Health online or come and hear me talk at the Rural Medicine Australia conference in Fremantle later this month (#RMA2012). More importantly, examine your own difficult airway equipment and have a look at some of the suggestions on sites like Broomedocs.com and Prehospitalmedicine.com, from whom I am grateful to have drawn inspiration.

For an overview see the VIMEO video here or have a look at the paper here.

As always, comments or criticisms are invited.

Essential Equipment

I’ve long struggled with the ideal contents of my prehospital pack. Time was that I carried enough gear in the back of the ute to perform an emergency laparotomy at the roadside…as time goes on I’ve slimmed things down…even more so on kayaking expeditions where weight and space are at a premium. Indeed, my minimalist approach to medical kit caused a small stir in the Australian sea-kayaking community, not least for the reliance on duct tape, superglue and suggesting the rectal route for treatment of dehydration and/or hypoglycaemia.


I’ve touched on thoughts for minimal standards for prehospital kit and a move towards similar standards in equipment and infusion protocols between small rural hospitals and retrieval services elsewhere in this blog. However, I was surprised to see the inclusion of a rubber chicken in Minh le Cong’s essential prehospital kit. You can read more over at Cliff Reid’s Resus.me site. But this of course raises the issue of what other ‘unique’ piece of kit that you feel you cannot function without.

Choking the chicken – an essential prerequisite for retrievalists?



For me, it’s always been a six-pack of Dr Tim Cooper’s Pale Ale (or Dr Tim’s) – I usually slip a six pack in the vac-mat for the retrieval team when they take away a sick patient – in thanks for their efforts and as a reward to enjoy back at base.



What weird extra kit do you carry in your prehospital or emergency bag?